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Failing to succeed

A key instruction to all students at Catmose is to fail more often. In fact, to go out of their way to choose activities that will challenge and they will initially do badly at. It is only by coming to terms with how failure feels is one able to reflect on and improve your performance to be very successful. There are no class room lessons, or lectures from home  that serve a student better than a real experience. We all need to learn to fail, to pick ourselves up (not to be rescued by our parents) and to carry on in the face of adversity. It is characteristic of all the most successful people that they have suffered significant failure;  people saying they aren’t good enough, or not creative, or not rich or not clever enough. It is equally the case that these successful people have carried on any way, learned from their mistakes and got better until they have achieved their goals.

If you google Andy Murray, Britain’s most successful ever tennis player, so many of the images that are returned show him failing. Each defeat spurring him on to train harder, get better and come back stronger, rather than to give-up, go home or say it is unfair.

Andy

He of course ultimately achieved his goal winning both Wimbledon and Olympic gold medals.

Andy success.png

Too many people don’t try for fear of failure. They shy away from attending an audition for a College production, to sing in the choir or to interview for head boy out of fear of not being successful. Of course by not applying they cannot be successful.

Steve Jobs, perhaps the epitome of success was also a failure. He was sacked from Apple, was given a huge pay out that should have been enough to retire on, but instead went onto revolutionise the animation industry at Pixar and Disney. He was of course enticed back to Apple when it was in dire straits, ultimately turning it into one of the most successful companies of all times. He never feared failure and in many ways courted it by setting himself extraordinarily ambitious goals. His success by dint of his talent and hard work far outweighed any failure.

Steve Jobs.png

I’ve know many failures in my own life. It was my aspiration, from an early age, to join the police, I was thwarted by poor interview technique. I ended up as a teacher, a career that better suited my skills but my early experience of poor interview meant I never again went into one without having done my homework about an organisation and the role I was applying for. In a similar way failing my driving test for being over ambitious in my use of the accelerator has made me a far better driver in the long run.

At the College we offer students opportunities to fail every day. There are the little things like answering a question in class when not sure of the answer. It could be learning a musical instrument, having to practise every day, making mistakes until confident enough to perform in front of an audience. In sport we offer over 20 different sport, plenty of opportunity to win and lose in matches. There is nothing quite like getting lost on a DofE expedition to ensure that next time you’ve planned your route better and listened carefully to the compass skills lesson!

To be successful in life, parents  need to let their children make mistakes, get things wrong and to sort it out for themselves. How will these children manage in the adult world of work when they are no longer their to bail them out and they don’t have the skills and experiences to sort issues out for themselves?

There is a difference though between failing and giving up. It is fine to get things wrong from time to time, to fail and reflect on your mistakes. It is an entirely different matter to quit every time this happens.

Fail more, quit less, be successful.

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